Suspect in 2015 quadruple murder in Washington, DC mansion convicted of 20 counts

Suspect in 2015 quadruple murder in Washington, DC mansion convicted of 20 counts

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The man accused in the 2015 quadruple murder of three family members and their housekeeper inside a Washington, D.C., mansion that was later set on fire has been found guilty.

Amy, Savvas and Philip Savopoulos, and their housekeeper, Veralicia Figuero, were brutally killed in May 2015 in the family’s multi-million dollar home in an elite neighborhood in the nation’s capitol.

Darren Wint was convicted of charges of murder, kidnapping, burglary, extortion, arson and theft. His sentencing hearing has been scheduled for February.

PHOTO: Daron Wint is seen in this undated booking photo from a previous arrest in Washington.Metropolitan Police Department
Daron Wint is seen in this undated booking photo from a previous arrest in Washington.

Wint had been on trial for seven weeks for the home invasion and brutal killings. During the trial, his defense team claimed his brothers actually committed the murders while he unknowingly remained downstairs.

Wint’s brother, Darrell Wint, testified against him and provided an alibi for the time frame of the crime.

(MORE: Mystery surrounds DC mansion murders 1 year later)

On May 14, 2015, the victims were held captive overnight as the adults were bound to chairs, beaten with a baseball bat and strangled. An autopsy found that the couple’s 10-year-old son, Philip, was killed by “thermal and sharp-force injuries.” He was found in his bedroom.

Family members were present when the verdict was read. Savvas Savopolous’ father, the elder Philip Savopolous, was visibly emotional as crying family members comforted each other.

PHOTO: Savvas and Amy Savopoulos are shown in this photo posted to Amy Savapoulos Facebook.Facebook
Savvas and Amy Savopoulos are shown in this photo posted to Amy Savapoulos’ Facebook.

Wint was tied to the scene after investigators found DNA evidence off a half-eaten pizza found in the home. After a nationwide manhunt, police found him on May 20, 2015, stopping his car near the Maryland-D.C. border. In it, they found “a large stack of what appeared to be $100 bills” and money orders, according to court documents.

Authorities described the horrific act as requiring “the presence and assistance of more than one person.

Savvas Savopoulos’ driver told police that his boss had texted him the night before the murders, ordering him to withdraw $40,000 and to leave the money on the seat of one of the cars parked in the family’s garage. The driver carried out the orders, police said.

(MORE: DC Mansion murder suspect pleads not guilty at arraignment)

Amy Savopoulos’ Porsche was found burning in a church parking lot in neighboring Prince George’s County, Maryland, on the afternoon of the murders.

PHOTO: Police work the scene of a fire-damaged multimillion-dollar home in northwest Washington home, May 22, 2015, where 46-year-old Savvas Savopoulos, his wife, the couples 10-year-old son Philip, and housekeeper were found dead.Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Police work the scene of a fire-damaged multimillion-dollar home in northwest Washington home, May 22, 2015, where 46-year-old Savvas Savopoulos, his wife, the couple’s 10-year-old son Philip, and housekeeper were found dead.

There were no signs of forced entry into the home.

(MORE: Timeline: Mysterious hours leading up to the DC mansion fire raise questions)

ABC News’ Jack Cloherty and Jack Date contributed to this report.

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